About your Search

20121226
20130103
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
in the christian science monitor's 15 best books of 2012 nonfiction. in "reagan and thatcher: the difficult relationship," richard aldous, literary professor at bard college, argues that the relationship between former president ronald reagan and former british prime minister margaret thatcher was more tumultuous than they let the public believe. author renya grande in "the distance between us: a memoir." in "embers of war: the fall of an empire and the making of america's vietnam," frederick logevall. and seth rosenfeld in "subversives," for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org, or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> two familiar faces to regular c-span and booktv watchers, norm ornstein and thomas mann. their most recent book, "it's even worse than it looks: how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." mr. ornstein, very quickly, what's the premise of your book? >> first, i have to say, peter, that we've been with c-span since the beginning, and i've got pictures o
research has been done, published in excellent journals. so we now know that science mismatch is a pervasive problem. although blacks are more like listen than similar whites to want to major in science and engineering when they go to college, they're much less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study at the university of virginia found that if you take two blacks or two students of any color, one of whom receives a large presence, one whom momentum, the student who receives a preference has about a 0% larger -- 40% larger chance of dropping out on his way through. mismatch also accepts academically-inclined students who would like to go into academics someday but very predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class and decide that economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california where voters passed proposition 209, and we had a large quasi-natural experiment of what happens when racial preferences are banned from an entire university system. the results of prop 209 are ext
the country. >> that is a really great question and sort of as much political science as anything else. anything could big factor. i don't want to sound to nerdly, but the rise of computer-based redistrict teen, strangely enough, that the members of congress and state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic, all republican. there are relatively few swing seats. we seen a bunch of change in the past couple election, but that's very much the exception rather than the rule. members of the house of representatives fear primaries more than they fear general elections by and large unless they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that doesn't explain the senate because you can't redistrict the senate, but it has had enormous impact at the state and state legislature level in the more polarized politics we have. i also think the news media plays a role in this. they used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news that everybody watched walter cronkite were hotly in brinkley and they sort of made up
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)